Links – November 17, 2016

I’m posting more news and commentary about Donald Trump’s transition team and move toward the presidency. It appears that competence and even ideology have little to do with his choice of advisors; loyalty to him is all. But he has said that he likes to keep people guessing. He chortled in a tweet that only he knows who the “finalists” will be. Government as a game show.

Also some nuclear stuff. Read More

Tokyo on a budget & other news

In a desperate bid to bring back international visitors, the Japanese Tourism Agency is pulling out all the stops, from lobbying A-list celebrities like Lady Gaga and Justin Beiber as spokesmen, to possibly offering 10,000 free flights in 2012.

In a desperate bid to bring back international visitors, the Japanese Tourism Agency is pulling out all the stops, from lobbying A-list celebrities like Lady Gaga and Justin Beiber as spokesmen, to possibly offering 10,000 free flights in 2012.

Since the devastating tsunami and nuclear accident in Fukushima earlier this year, many travelers have been wary to return. Pair that with the recent appreciation of the Yen, and you have a country that is now battling a radioactive and expensive reputation. But Tokyo, the capital, was largely unaffected by the earthquake, and despite the strong Yen, there are a surprisingly good number of free activities that will not blow the budget.

More Information on travel deals

Cheryl takes on reporters who don’t know the difference between radiation and radioactivity, but are quick to scare the public by publishing a very big number of becquerels to scare their readership.

Japan’s government has abandoned its policy of promoting atomic power, saying it will reduce reliance on the sector in its first annual review of energy since the Fukushima nuclear disaster.

North Korea is talking again, but Panetta is skeptical.

On a positive note, the Brits think that world power is swinging back to the United States as US will be well on its way to self-sufficiency in fuel and energy. Manufacturing will have closed the labour gap with China in a clutch of key industries. The current account might even be in surplus.